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  1. Yay! Evolution for tykes! (and some of my sophomores, I am thinking…)

  2. nprglobalhealth:

This Kenyan Runner Can’t See But He Has A Far-Reaching Vision
When Henry Wanyoike and Joseph Kibunja first started running, it was out of necessity. The childhood friends had no other way to travel the three miles from their Kenyan village to school. So they made the barefoot trek every day, in both directions, regardless of weather.
Thirty years later, Wanyoike and Kibunja are still running together, only now, they’re headed to the finish lines of races around the world — and often getting there first.
Although Kenya is known for producing champion runners, the duo stands out: Wanyoike is blind and Kibunja serves as his guide.
In 1995, two years after graduating from high school as a track star, Wanyoike suffered a stroke. He lost his sight and thought he’d never run again. Three years later, at a rehabilitation center, someone suggested he try with a partner. To his amazement, it worked. And it worked even better once his pal Kibunja took on the guide role.
They stay side-to-side and hold a foot-long blue and green rope between them — in Wanyoike’s right hand and Kibunja’s left. Through a combination of verbal and physical cues, Kibunja indicates when they need to turn, avoid an obstacle and, of course, speed up to stay ahead of the competition.
The technique has allowed them to win gold medals at multiple Paralympics, set world records (including the fastest blind marathon in just 2:31:31) and serve as an example for just about everyone they meet.
"Our message is that we need to work together. We can achieve more with combined effort," Wanyoike says, just after leading a group fun run at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in Washington, D.C., last month. He and Kibunja were part of the Kenyan delegation showcasing their culture to visitors on the National Mall.
The power of Wanyoike’s story, says Kenyan singer Linda Muthama, has made him one of the most beloved people in the country. She even sings a song about him: “He dreamed, he overcame.”
Continue reading.
Photo: Joseph Kibunja guides blind runner Henry Wanyoike (in sunglasses).(Ryan Kellman/NPR)


Powerful - as a runner I am in awe of these men.

    nprglobalhealth:

    This Kenyan Runner Can’t See But He Has A Far-Reaching Vision

    When Henry Wanyoike and Joseph Kibunja first started running, it was out of necessity. The childhood friends had no other way to travel the three miles from their Kenyan village to school. So they made the barefoot trek every day, in both directions, regardless of weather.

    Thirty years later, Wanyoike and Kibunja are still running together, only now, they’re headed to the finish lines of races around the world — and often getting there first.

    Although Kenya is known for producing champion runners, the duo stands out: Wanyoike is blind and Kibunja serves as his guide.

    In 1995, two years after graduating from high school as a track star, Wanyoike suffered a stroke. He lost his sight and thought he’d never run again. Three years later, at a rehabilitation center, someone suggested he try with a partner. To his amazement, it worked. And it worked even better once his pal Kibunja took on the guide role.

    They stay side-to-side and hold a foot-long blue and green rope between them — in Wanyoike’s right hand and Kibunja’s left. Through a combination of verbal and physical cues, Kibunja indicates when they need to turn, avoid an obstacle and, of course, speed up to stay ahead of the competition.

    The technique has allowed them to win gold medals at multiple Paralympics, set world records (including the fastest blind marathon in just 2:31:31) and serve as an example for just about everyone they meet.

    "Our message is that we need to work together. We can achieve more with combined effort," Wanyoike says, just after leading a group fun run at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in Washington, D.C., last month. He and Kibunja were part of the Kenyan delegation showcasing their culture to visitors on the National Mall.

    The power of Wanyoike’s story, says Kenyan singer Linda Muthama, has made him one of the most beloved people in the country. She even sings a song about him: “He dreamed, he overcame.”

    Continue reading.

    Photo: Joseph Kibunja guides blind runner Henry Wanyoike (in sunglasses).(Ryan Kellman/NPR)

    Powerful - as a runner I am in awe of these men.

  3. The title originates from the Roman poet, Juvenal from about A.D. 100.

    The title originates from the Roman poet, Juvenal from about A.D. 100.

  4. I was lucky to hear Harlan Ellison speak 25 years ago. I met him afterward. It was a memorable day.

    I was lucky to hear Harlan Ellison speak 25 years ago. I met him afterward. It was a memorable day.

  5. Map of the current status of White Nose Syndrome (WNS). WNS is a fungal infection that causes massive bat mortality. The fungus grows on many media (besides bats) which is bad news for bats as it will likely always be in the environment from now on. It appears to be an invasive species from Europe (where the bats are not affected by related fungi). 
There is some good news as bats in Vermont are showing signs of resistance (evolution in action). But given all the other injuries to bat populations (mostly at our hands) WNS may push some species into extinction. More found here

    Map of the current status of White Nose Syndrome (WNS). WNS is a fungal infection that causes massive bat mortality. The fungus grows on many media (besides bats) which is bad news for bats as it will likely always be in the environment from now on. It appears to be an invasive species from Europe (where the bats are not affected by related fungi).

    There is some good news as bats in Vermont are showing signs of resistance (evolution in action). But given all the other injuries to bat populations (mostly at our hands) WNS may push some species into extinction. More found here

  6. Cold war comics.

    Cold war comics.

About me

I met the discoverer of Pluto. I have looked into a nuclear reactor and saw Cherenkov radiation. I did field work in shark-infested waters. I have an Erdos number of 5. I have launched satellites. You could say I like science.

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