});
  1. This appeared in my FB stream. 
1. What a capricious deity that saved this guy’s life and let die thousands of less worthy? non believing? not worth saving? others.
2. As a doctor maybe, just maybe, he would have the capacity to understand that maybe his genetic makeup provided him with the lucky alleles to have more resistance to ebola than others or that the dedicated researchers that have been working on the experimental drug or the doctors in Atlanta saved his life. Or more likely it is a combination of the drug and the doctors’ work.

    This appeared in my FB stream. 

    1. What a capricious deity that saved this guy’s life and let die thousands of less worthy? non believing? not worth saving? others.

    2. As a doctor maybe, just maybe, he would have the capacity to understand that maybe his genetic makeup provided him with the lucky alleles to have more resistance to ebola than others or that the dedicated researchers that have been working on the experimental drug or the doctors in Atlanta saved his life. Or more likely it is a combination of the drug and the doctors’ work.

  2. You really haven’t lived until you have a nemesis. I have two.

    You really haven’t lived until you have a nemesis. I have two.

  3. An oldie but a goodie.

    An oldie but a goodie.

  4. jtotheizzoe:

    ecosapienshow:

    Are we in the midst of a sixth mass extinction? 

    Source -  NYT graphics editor Bill Marsh

    Welcome to the Anthropocene, folks.

    It is interesting that this question is being asked. I have been teaching about the 6th mass extinction for a decade now. This really is beyond the point of asking. Much like asking, “is adding CO2 to the atmosphere causing changes to the climate?”  Or “Are we expecting to see the sun come up tomorrow morning?”

  5. "

    Paul, “a former physician,” offered the chemical DDT as a “viable alternative for treatment,” as the release put it. The proposal would likely face some resistance as DDT is also a controversial insecticide that “may cause serious health effects,” according to Scientific American. But Paul believes those health risks were never proven.

    “The absolute proof of the danger of DDT was never — as far as I’m concerned — proven,” Paul argued. “Instead, what we do is use very expensive organic phosphates [to treat Ebola], which do kill people. … If DDT isn’t quite as dangerous as they said, and if you could save a million people from this illness … then we could think about it.”

    "

    From here.

    As an MD Mr. Paul’s knowledge is stunningly missing. Ebola is spread via contact with body fluids from primates and bats. DDT is an insecticide. Spray all of Africa with DDT and you would not change the rate of transmission of Ebola at all. This is like saying if I give everyone an antibiotic I will cure HIV.

    His even wilder claim that DDT was not shown to be dangerous is also a stunning example of either ignorance or yet another attempt to promote industries at the expense of public health and the environment.

    Here is the kicker - DDT is used in Africa to combat malaria currently and scientists are recommending that its use be reduced because of the harm it causes humans.

  6. Alphonse Mucha’s stained glass window in the St. Vitus Cathedral in Prague.

  7. Domes of Prague

  8. Domes of Vienna

  9. Yay! Evolution for tykes! (and some of my sophomores, I am thinking…)

  10. nprglobalhealth:

This Kenyan Runner Can’t See But He Has A Far-Reaching Vision
When Henry Wanyoike and Joseph Kibunja first started running, it was out of necessity. The childhood friends had no other way to travel the three miles from their Kenyan village to school. So they made the barefoot trek every day, in both directions, regardless of weather.
Thirty years later, Wanyoike and Kibunja are still running together, only now, they’re headed to the finish lines of races around the world — and often getting there first.
Although Kenya is known for producing champion runners, the duo stands out: Wanyoike is blind and Kibunja serves as his guide.
In 1995, two years after graduating from high school as a track star, Wanyoike suffered a stroke. He lost his sight and thought he’d never run again. Three years later, at a rehabilitation center, someone suggested he try with a partner. To his amazement, it worked. And it worked even better once his pal Kibunja took on the guide role.
They stay side-to-side and hold a foot-long blue and green rope between them — in Wanyoike’s right hand and Kibunja’s left. Through a combination of verbal and physical cues, Kibunja indicates when they need to turn, avoid an obstacle and, of course, speed up to stay ahead of the competition.
The technique has allowed them to win gold medals at multiple Paralympics, set world records (including the fastest blind marathon in just 2:31:31) and serve as an example for just about everyone they meet.
"Our message is that we need to work together. We can achieve more with combined effort," Wanyoike says, just after leading a group fun run at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in Washington, D.C., last month. He and Kibunja were part of the Kenyan delegation showcasing their culture to visitors on the National Mall.
The power of Wanyoike’s story, says Kenyan singer Linda Muthama, has made him one of the most beloved people in the country. She even sings a song about him: “He dreamed, he overcame.”
Continue reading.
Photo: Joseph Kibunja guides blind runner Henry Wanyoike (in sunglasses).(Ryan Kellman/NPR)


Powerful - as a runner I am in awe of these men.

    nprglobalhealth:

    This Kenyan Runner Can’t See But He Has A Far-Reaching Vision

    When Henry Wanyoike and Joseph Kibunja first started running, it was out of necessity. The childhood friends had no other way to travel the three miles from their Kenyan village to school. So they made the barefoot trek every day, in both directions, regardless of weather.

    Thirty years later, Wanyoike and Kibunja are still running together, only now, they’re headed to the finish lines of races around the world — and often getting there first.

    Although Kenya is known for producing champion runners, the duo stands out: Wanyoike is blind and Kibunja serves as his guide.

    In 1995, two years after graduating from high school as a track star, Wanyoike suffered a stroke. He lost his sight and thought he’d never run again. Three years later, at a rehabilitation center, someone suggested he try with a partner. To his amazement, it worked. And it worked even better once his pal Kibunja took on the guide role.

    They stay side-to-side and hold a foot-long blue and green rope between them — in Wanyoike’s right hand and Kibunja’s left. Through a combination of verbal and physical cues, Kibunja indicates when they need to turn, avoid an obstacle and, of course, speed up to stay ahead of the competition.

    The technique has allowed them to win gold medals at multiple Paralympics, set world records (including the fastest blind marathon in just 2:31:31) and serve as an example for just about everyone they meet.

    "Our message is that we need to work together. We can achieve more with combined effort," Wanyoike says, just after leading a group fun run at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in Washington, D.C., last month. He and Kibunja were part of the Kenyan delegation showcasing their culture to visitors on the National Mall.

    The power of Wanyoike’s story, says Kenyan singer Linda Muthama, has made him one of the most beloved people in the country. She even sings a song about him: “He dreamed, he overcame.”

    Continue reading.

    Photo: Joseph Kibunja guides blind runner Henry Wanyoike (in sunglasses).(Ryan Kellman/NPR)

    Powerful - as a runner I am in awe of these men.

About me

I met the discoverer of Pluto. I have looked into a nuclear reactor and saw Cherenkov radiation. I did field work in shark-infested waters. I have an Erdos number of 5. I have launched satellites. You could say I like science.

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