});
  1. Ed White on the first Gemini EVA.

    Ed White on the first Gemini EVA.

  2. HL-10 Lifting Body and pilot overflown by the drop ship.

    HL-10 Lifting Body and pilot overflown by the drop ship.

  3. X-15 with B-52 Mothership. NASA photograph.

    X-15 with B-52 Mothership. NASA photograph.

  4. On this day in 1865, the Civil War ended. The United States’ bloodiest conflict was over. Confederate dead await burial after the Battle of Antietam. Photo by Alexander Gardner

    On this day in 1865, the Civil War ended. The United States’ bloodiest conflict was over. Confederate dead await burial after the Battle of Antietam. Photo by Alexander Gardner

  5. The launch of DMSP-19. The U.S. Military weather monitoring satellite. The first launch of this series of satellites was in 1962.

  6. Science I have done. These are some randomly selected figures from papers I have authored or co-authored. Just because.

  7. In Nature Communications a paper showing the oldest arthropod cardiovascular system in the organism Fuxianhuia protensa. The fossil dates from about 520 MYA, in the early Cambrian.

    The figure caption for the top figure:

    (a) Image of whole cardiovascular system showing broad heart (H) extending between thoracic tergites T7–T14. The CVS tapers from the level of T13 to become reduced to a single vessel at abdominal tergite Ab3 that fades to invisibility at level of Ab4. Cerebral (ce) and post-cerebral (p ce) CVS stem from paired frontal arteries (f a, bracketed upper right) that are connected by a stout heterolateral vessel (arrowed 1); (b) energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) showing CVS represented by a carbon film; (c) EDX resolves Fe at the level of T13–T17; (d) enlargement of EDX between T10 and T12 demonstrating intense puncta (arrowheads) flanked by fine collateral, together interpreted as ventral projecting vessels; (e) enlargement of heart and lateral vessels between T7 and T11 demonstrating broad origins (asterisks) of lateral vessels bifurcating into main flanking arteries (at arrowheads); and (f) CVS at T11–T13 showing well preserved traces of main flanking arteries (arrowheads). Scale bar, 2 mm.

    The Figure caption for the lower figure:

    (a) Cardiovascular system (red) shown in relation to the brain and central nervous system (blue); (b) whole reconstruction, with brain and segmental ganglia (blue) shown in relation to serial arrangements of tergites. The reconstruction of the vascular system assumes that posterior abdominal extensions of the dorsal vessel are likely present although these are not defined by carbon traces in the fossil. The reconstruction of the nervous system infers that paired nerves are associated with the telson. As described elsewhere1, 2, 6, tergites do not reflect true metamerism, there being >1 ganglion coincident with each tergite from T7. Likewise, lateral vessels occur one per tergite frontally in the thorax but are more crowded further towards the rear; (c) cardiovascular system (red) in relation to the gut (green).

  8. I would never have thought that teaching evolution in the 21st Century would  be such a sysiphian struggle. In a country that has produced some of the greatest science we elect anti-intellectual fools that want time to march backward.
Article here:
A State Fossil For S. Carolina Faces Mammoth Obstacle

    I would never have thought that teaching evolution in the 21st Century would  be such a sysiphian struggle. In a country that has produced some of the greatest science we elect anti-intellectual fools that want time to march backward.

    Article here:

    A State Fossil For S. Carolina Faces Mammoth Obstacle

  9. Debris from this week’s earthquake off the coast of Chile. While there was little loss of life, damage was sustained to the fishing vessels from the tsunami. 
Credit: REUTERS/Francisco Alcayaga Motta

    Debris from this week’s earthquake off the coast of Chile. While there was little loss of life, damage was sustained to the fishing vessels from the tsunami.

    Credit: REUTERS/Francisco Alcayaga Motta

  10. Gruesome words of the day: anthropodermic bibliopegy
Books bound in human skin. The article has a particularly disturbing tail of how one such book was made.

    Gruesome words of the day: anthropodermic bibliopegy

    Books bound in human skin. The article has a particularly disturbing tail of how one such book was made.

About me

I met the discoverer of Pluto. I have looked into a nuclear reactor and saw Cherenkov radiation. I did field work in shark-infested waters. I have an Erdos number of 5. I have launched satellites. You could say I like science.

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